Persönlicher Status und Werkzeuge

Optoacoustics and Molecular Imaging Engineering Group

Principal Investigator: Prof. Dr. Daniel Razansky

Our research lies at the forefront of the rapidly evolving area of molecular imaging sciences. As opposed to traditional anatomical imaging approaches, this multidisciplinary field aims at early diagnosis and provides improved classification of stage and severity of disease, an objective assessment of treatment efficacy, and a reliable prognosis. It is also an important tool for the evaluation of physiological and pathophysiological processes, and for the development of new therapies. We are mainly focusing on the development of new imaging approaches based on optoacoustics and contribute to the creation of these new technologies in several diverse ways, from the establishment of solid theoretical background, inverse methods, and innovative instrumentation to the development of in-vivo imaging methodologies. These new abilities allow for high resolution imaging beyond the penetration limit of modern microscopy at the various penetration scales into living tissues, from several millimeters to several centimeters. Examples of projects include real-time optoacoustic microscopy for deep-tissue functional imaging applications, development of 2D and 3D tomographic systems for clinical diagnostics and small animal research, development of novel image reconstruction and visualization techniques for real-time tomography.

   

Relevant publications (view all publications)


R. Ma et al., Fast scanning coaxial optoacoustic microscopy, Biomed. Opt. Exp. 3(7), 1724-1731 (2012)

X. L. Deán-Ben et al., Accurate model-based inversion algorithm for three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography, IEEE Trans. Med. Imag. 31(10), 1922-1928 (2012)

D. Razansky, A. Buehler, and V. Ntziachristos Volumetric real-time multispectral optoacoustic tomography of biomarkers, Nature Prot., 6(8), 1121-1129 (2011)

V. Ntziachristos and D. Razansky Molecular imaging by means of multispectral opto-acoustic tomography (MSOT), Chem. Rev. 110(5), 2783-2794 (2010)

D. Razansky et al., Multi-spectral optoacoustic tomography of deep-seated fluorescent proteins in-vivo, Nature Phot. 3(7), 412-417 (2009)

C. Vinegoni et al., Live imaging of drosophila melanogaster pupae with mesoscopic fluorescence tomography, Nature Meth., 5(1), 45-47 (2008).

People


               

Title

Name

Function

Mail

Prof. Dr.

Razansky, Daniel

PI
Dr.

Deán Ben, Luis

PostDoc
Dr.

Gottschalk, Sven

PostDoc
Dr.

Estrada, Hector

PostDoc
Dr.

Ford, Steven

PostDoc
Dr.

Pang, Genny

PostDoc
Dr.

Sela, Gali

PostDoc

Fehm, Thomas

PhD Student

Kneipp, Moritz

PhD Student

Lutzweiler, Christian

PhD Student

Sadasivam, Magesh

PhD Student

Turner, Jake

PhD Student

Lin, Amy

PhD Student

Mandal, Subhamoi

PhD Student

Degtyaruk, Oleksiy

BSc Student

Özbek, Ali

BSc Student

     

Research Highlights


Real-time Optoacoustic Microscopy

Fluorescent microscopy have become essential tool for studying life at the cellular and sub-cellular level, re-defining ways in which we investigate biology. Indeed, optical spectrum is particularly attractive for biological interrogations as it can impart highly versatile contrast of cellular and sub-cellular function as well as employ highly specific contrast agents and markers not available for other modalities. However, technical limitations arising from intense light scattering in living tissues bound the main-stream of high resolution optical imaging applications to microscopic studies at shallow depths that do not allow the exploration of the full potential of novel classes of agents for volumetric imaging of entire organs, small animals or human tissues. We develop multispectral optoacoustic microscopy techniques capable of high-resolution visualization of functional and molecular contrast deep within highly light-scattering living organisms and in real time. The technology is applied in areas such as functional neuroimaging and study of cancer heterogeneity.

Volumetric tomography and fast inverse methods

Optoacoustic phenomenon is unique in a way it allows to generate complete volumetric tomographic dataset from the imaged object using a single interrogating laser pulse. Yet, multiple technical limitations, related to lack of appropriate detection technology, digital sampling and processing capacities, and efficient inverse methods, make implementation of real-time imaging and tomography challenging. Here we undertake substantial technological steps that bring optoacoustic imaging to a real time tomographic performance in two and three dimensions and enable imaging several millimeters to centimeters into tissues. This will make it suitable for attaining high dynamic contrast in intact living tissues and an ideal candidate for both intrinsic and targeted biomarker-based high performance imaging in pre-clinical research and clinical diagnostics. The developments are greatly supported by our algorithmic research into inverse theory and fast GPU-accelerated image reconstruction techniques. We are further addressing the challenges of quantitative image reconstruction by development of multi-spectral processing algorithms, light propagation modeling and artifact reduction methods.

Multi-modal and hybrid imaging

Due to its hybrid nature, which involves both light and sound, optoacoustic imaging can be seamlessly integrated with other pure optical and ultrasonic imaging techniques to provide complementary contrast advantages and capitalize on the particular strengths of each modality. In this way, it can for instance fill the gap existing between the high-resolution optical microscopy, which can only image up to a several hundreds of microns in most tissues, and the low-resolution deep tissue imaging approaches based on diffuse optics. On the other hand, information retrieved with optoacoustics can be used to improve image quality and quantification abilities of pure optical or ultrasonic methods or vice versa. For instance, the absorption maps, delivered by tomographic optoacoustic reconstructions, can be subsequently used to better normalize images acquired with fluorescence molecular tomography. Another example is using ultrasound as a calibration technique for reducing optoacoustic imaging artifacts due to acoustic heterogeneities.